Glutamine

Glutamine

Glutamine is a non essential amino acid that is used in the biosynthesis of proteins and is found naturally in the body. In most cases, normally the most abundant amino acid and actually makes up about 2/3 of those found in muscle tissue. Your body needs 20 essential and nonessential amino acids that work to produce various proteins. Being able to get adequate protein is crucial for maintaining your health.

Its side chain is similar to that of glutamic acid, except the carboxylic acid group is replaced by an amide. It is classified as a charge-neutral, polar amino acid. It is non-essential and conditionally essential in humans, meaning the body can usually synthesize sufficient amounts of it, but in some instances of stress, the body’s demand for glutamine increases, and must be obtained from the diet.

In human blood, it is the most abundant free amino acid. It is non-essential and conditionally essential in humans, meaning the body can usually synthesize sufficient amounts of it, but in some instances of stress, the body’s demand for glutamine increases, and glutamine must be obtained from the diet. Glutamine is found in protein-rich sources such as beef, chicken, fish, dairy products, eggs, vegetables like beans, beets, cabbage, spinach, carrots, parsley, vegetable juices and also in wheat, papaya, Brussels sprouts, celery, kale and fermented foods like miso.

This amino acid exists in two different forms: L-glutamine and D-glutamine. L-g is the one that is found in foods and supplements and is used to make proteins and perform other functions. L-g is the most abundant amino acid in the blood and other body fluids. Although it is produced naturally in the body, sometimes the body requires more than is produced. This is when supplementation is necessary.

 

Glutamine

Benefits:

  • Improves metabolism 
  • Protects digestive system
  • Supports liver health
  • Boosts brain function
  • Regulates mood
  • Boosts Immunity 
  • Regulates blood glucose levels 
  • Helps with depression, anxiety and insomnia